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In 1937, down on his luck, and after launching another short-lived New York newspaper, the Broadway Tattler, Stephen G. Clow moved to Toronto, where he helped publisher Morris Ruby start a number of spicy humour magazines. These included the Canadian Tattler and Canadian versions of U.S. titles like Zippy and Paree. Among the magazines which Ruby published with Clow’s help was a Canadian version of Broadway Brevities, full of material lifted from U.S. magazines and edited, at least for a few months, by Clow himself. Clow returned to New York City after he and Ruby were arrested by Ontario police on charges of publishing obscene materials. (These charges were eventually dropped.) Clow died in New York City in 1941, penniless and alone. The Canadian Brevities was published for almost another decade, calling itself, in its later years, “Canada’s Oldest Humor Magazine.” By the 1940s, the magazine was devoted almost exclusively to risqué cartoons, jokes and stories.

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